Category: season seven

No Quinn, No Problem: Why Homeland Is Having Its Best Season in Years

No Quinn, No Problem: Why Homeland Is Having Its Best Season in Years

No spoiler but I think you will be pleased with 7.01…🤷🏻‍♀️. I’m back to being a casual viewer, much more enjoyable than watching your fave being tortured repeatedly with no relief. I thought it was a good, packed episode, left me a bit hopeful for the season. No longer crave to see Q remembered, memorialized, called back, or whatever. Frankly anything related to Q will just bring back the sadness and there is plenty Rupert out there to stay happy 😍. I prefer him 1000 times over CD!

Ahh I just finished watching it. No spoilers, but I personally really liked it. (Sara is a purist and will be watching at 9pm EST). 

Quinn’s absence was definitely noticeable, but like… the show still felt like Homeland. And while the episode definitely is a continuation of S6, it also felt fresh to me. 

There’s still plenty of room for the Quinnspiracy, of course, but you are definitely taking the healthy route and keeping hopes and expectations to a minimum. Keep doing that. It’s good for you.

‘Homeland’ Season 7: Once Again, It’s All Up to Carrie

‘Homeland’ Season 7: Once Again, It’s All Up to Carrie:

This review contains a really nice shout out to Amy Hargreaves as Maggie, whom I maintain is the true true heroine of Homeland. 

I had a moment about Amy Hargreaves the other day which was related to my EQUIVALENT moment about Carrie from that SHO Instagram video. Namely, she completely nails the big sister/little sister fight dynamic. As Carrie is yelling at her, her chin quivers, you can see her mouthing the words Carrie is saying back to her. Y’all, this is a total big sister thing. Did anyone else recognize this? It was so intimate and real and totally right on. Anyway, suffice to say I’m looking forward to more Maggie this season. 

About Quinn and in relation to Homeland’s proclivity for a portraying tortured protagonists, Mike Hale writes:

Instead it elevated a supporting character, the C.I.A. killer Peter Quinn (Rupert Friend), to co-starring status — he, rather than Carrie, essentially solved the mystery in Season 6 — while saddling him with a monstrously debilitating set of post-traumatic mental and physical afflictions. It was the same “Homeland” formula with a different character, while Carrie slid into the role of concerned helpmate usually occupied by her C.I.A. mentor Saul Berenson (Mandy Patinkin).

Claire Danes Could Really Use a Nap

Claire Danes Could Really Use a Nap:

Interview with the NYT (which I can’t actually find on the NYT but this is an exact replica). The interviewer asks two questions related to Quinn:

Q: Quinn’s death sent fans into a tailspin.

A: I think what (the showrunner Alex Gansa) wanted to do was not just “off” a central character. He wanted to spend time with a veteran who was wounded on a lot of levels — psychologically and emotionally and physically — and take seriously the sacrifice and the cost of making that commitment to your country. That was an earnest effort to honor the work that veterans have done.

Q: Were you on the side of fans who longed for a romance between Carrie and Quinn?

A: I mean, everybody wants that. But I think they did have a romance. It just didn’t take a conventional form. They’re not conventional people. And I think it’s really interesting to consider that there are some people who might not fully be able to achieve real intimacy that we all recognize as valid.

She also talks about Carrie doing street drugs (!!!) to self-medicate this season which is just … beyond.

I think what she says about season six being a “ghost story” is kind of interesting – I rewatched the scene with the court-ordered therapist the other night and Carrie talks then about being terrified Quinn wanted to “finish the job” after nearly dying in Berlin. That may be what she’s alluding to. 

‘Homeland’ Season 7: TV Review

‘Homeland’ Season 7: TV Review:

This is the second review I’ve read that mentions that Maggie’s daughter Josie is like Dana Brody 2.0 and considering I miss Dana Brody more and more as the seasons go on, I ain’t mad about that. (I mean, yes, I know they mean it as an insult but I LOVE her… commence eyeroll.)

There is a hilarious summation of Jake Weber’s performance as O’Keefe, which segues into this critique of the premiere:

Despite some outsized acting and the large implications of Keane’s actions, on a narrative level the Homeland premiere is decidedly small. Although Homeland has fundamentally been a character-driven drama, the threat of the world on the brink of cataclysm has always lingered on the surface. Assassinations. Terrorist actions. Upheavals of power. The seventh season premiere keeps the implied stakes high, but the literal stakes middling. A lot of time is spent on Robert Knepper’s General McClendon, a character I remember from last season only in the haziest terms. No time at all is spent memorializing Quinn, an initial choice that will really irritate a small segment of fans while having no impact at all on me. Through most of the premiere, nothing explodes and there’s no talk of high-level catastrophes and instead we watch Carrie engage in rudimentary spycraft. She’s setting up a meeting. She’s covering her tracks and watching for tails. She’s observing. It’s more muted John Le Carre-esque spook-work than the show’s usual melodrama. Spoiler alert: Carrie doesn’t even sob.

Review: ‘Homeland’ season 7 seems off

Review: ‘Homeland’ season 7 seems off:

hellyeahomeland:

What’s the opposite of Ben Travers’ review? It’s probably this. Verne Gay in the first two paragraphs really nails why killing Quinn made no narrative (or business) sense, especially if the Homeland that Gay depicts in the first episode persists for two more seasons. The part about the winners and losers of Homeland is very interesting. 

Let’s talk about Quinn, because “Homeland” obviously doesn’t want to anymore. Killed in the sixth-season finale, he’s a distant memory by the start of the seventh. With Saul in jail, Carrie on a mission to save democracy, and crazy Keane drooling, so to speak, over her iPad in the Oval Office, Washington has gone nuts. Where is Peter now that we need him?

Killing off Quinn was the single most controversial move in “Homeland” history. Arguably more than Carrie, certainly more than Saul, “Homeland’s” own psychically tortured Jason Bourne had become the soul of this series, and to a certain extent, remains the ghost in its machine. By excising Quinn, “Homeland” excised one of the better parts of itself: the part that says Deep State assassins like him are mere tools of the corrupt political establishment they serve. Shaped, or rather poisoned, by Dar Adal (F. Murray Abraham), the true angels of Peter’s nature ultimately prevailed, and he died saving Keane. No matter what they do or whom they kill, Carrie and Saul will always land on their feet, in a better job, or closer (and closer) to the seat of power. They’re the winners of “Homeland.” Peter Quinn was the loser. Losers, particularly this one, are often more interesting.

Absent his stabilizing presence, or his ballast to the Carrie/Saul axis, “Homeland” seems in an especially strange, vertiginous place by the start of the seventh. That’s partly by design, of course. “Homeland” doesn’t like to just reflect the zeitgeist but become it: If a real president is battling with the intelligence community, and if real civil liberties are threatened, and if real fake news has become real news, then so goes “Homeland.”

Review: ‘Homeland’ season 7 seems off

Review: ‘Homeland’ season 7 seems off:

What’s the opposite of Ben Travers’ review? It’s probably this. Verne Gay in the first two paragraphs really nails why killing Quinn made no narrative (or business) sense, especially if the Homeland that Gay depicts in the first episode persists for two more seasons. The part about the winners and losers of Homeland is very interesting. 

Let’s talk about Quinn, because “Homeland” obviously doesn’t want to anymore. Killed in the sixth-season finale, he’s a distant memory by the start of the seventh. With Saul in jail, Carrie on a mission to save democracy, and crazy Keane drooling, so to speak, over her iPad in the Oval Office, Washington has gone nuts. Where is Peter now that we need him?

Killing off Quinn was the single most controversial move in “Homeland” history. Arguably more than Carrie, certainly more than Saul, “Homeland’s” own psychically tortured Jason Bourne had become the soul of this series, and to a certain extent, remains the ghost in its machine. By excising Quinn, “Homeland” excised one of the better parts of itself: the part that says Deep State assassins like him are mere tools of the corrupt political establishment they serve. Shaped, or rather poisoned, by Dar Adal (F. Murray Abraham), the true angels of Peter’s nature ultimately prevailed, and he died saving Keane. No matter what they do or whom they kill, Carrie and Saul will always land on their feet, in a better job, or closer (and closer) to the seat of power. They’re the winners of “Homeland.” Peter Quinn was the loser. Losers, particularly this one, are often more interesting.

Absent his stabilizing presence, or his ballast to the Carrie/Saul axis, “Homeland” seems in an especially strange, vertiginous place by the start of the seventh. That’s partly by design, of course. “Homeland” doesn’t like to just reflect the zeitgeist but become it: If a real president is battling with the intelligence community, and if real civil liberties are threatened, and if real fake news has become real news, then so goes “Homeland.”

‘Homeland’ Review: A Riveting Season 7 Asks If the World’s Too Crazy for Even Carrie to Save

‘Homeland’ Review: A Riveting Season 7 Asks If the World’s Too Crazy for Even Carrie to Save:

A pretty glowing, A-, non-spoilery review from Ben Travers at Indiewire:

But in 2018, the world feels irreversibly divided. No matter what Carrie does to strengthen her webbing, the ferry halves are sinking on both sides. Confronted with a growing child and lacking a personal life, she’s forced to consider why she’s holding on at all.

It’s too early to tell where Season 7 will take this question — just talking about “Homeland” after one episode and without spoilers is, as you can likely tell, quite the challenge. How far will Carrie be pushed toward reconsidering her choices? The writers have done that before, most notably during her “drone queen” phase in Season 4, but the juxtaposition of Carrie’s curbed craziness just as the world spins off its axis creates compelling questions: Who’s crazy in a world gone mad? Who can bring it back? How?

‘Homeland’ Boss on Season 7’s Trump Inspiration, Alex Jones and RIP Peter Quinn

‘Homeland’ Boss on Season 7’s Trump Inspiration, Alex Jones and RIP Peter Quinn:

Pretty interesting interview (comparatively) in which Gansa addresses the lack of reference to PQ in 7.01, and Russia’s involvement in the storyline, among other topics. 

You’ve always said before that theirs [Carrie and Saul’s] is the core relationship of this show. Are we going to see them come back together? Is that going to continue to play out over the course of the season?

Especially with Peter Quinn gone, that is the first and foremost relationship on the show. And that is really what we’re going to be exploring in season 7 and season 8.

But you don’t reference Quinn’s absence in the first episode. Is that going to come back and play a role?

Oh, he will definitely be referenced. He is not referenced in the first episode. But his absence will be addressed.

AG discusses a sneak peak from 7.01.

AG discusses a sneak peak from 7.01.