Category: Not Our Homeland

8 bad decisions that TV shows had to apologise…

8 bad decisions that TV shows had to apologise for:

findmyrupertfriend:

1. Homeland – killing Peter Quinn

The shooting death of Rupert Friend’s troubled ex-spook hit Homeland fans hard. It felt particularly cruel since the spy thriller’s sixth season had seen Quinn recovering after a previous near-death experience, with terrorists exposing him to a chemical weapon.

So incensed were these angry fans, they took out a full page letter in The Hollywood Reporter, demanding that the show’s creators explain themselves.

“It has been over four months since your sixth season concluded,” they fumed. “In the midst of a mass exodus of your most loyal and devoted viewers, we have asked repeatedly for you to address your audience and the unceremonious end to a character that you openly acknowledge was beloved by millions. You have been silent. We are asking again.”

This forced the hand of showrunner Alex Gansa, who responded with a candid statement. “It is painful to hear that that even a small segment of our devoted audience is disappointed in Homeland,” he said, while insisting that Quinn had at least “died a hero”.

Tweet some love to Jeffery Morgan for this! Morgan JefferyVerified account@morganjeffery. We’re pretty sure his email address is mjeffery@digitalspy.com.

‘Homeland’ Season 7: Once Again, It’s All Up t…

‘Homeland’ Season 7: Once Again, It’s All Up to Carrie:

findmyrupertfriend:

Re: Season 6 into season 7:

Instead it elevated a supporting character, the C.I.A. killer Peter Quinn (Rupert Friend), to co-starring status — he, rather than Carrie, essentially solved the mystery in Season 6 — while saddling him with a monstrously debilitating set of post-traumatic mental and physical afflictions. It was the same “Homeland” formula with a different character, while Carrie slid into the role of concerned helpmate usually occupied by her C.I.A. mentor Saul Berenson (Mandy Patinkin).

Which brings us to Season 7, which opens in the aftermath of Peter Quinn’s heroic death. (Apologies for the spoiler if you haven’t watched Season 6, or been aware of the #NotOurHomeland fan campaign expressing outrage over his treatment.)

With Quinn gone, where will the show go to find the crazy? (“Crazy” here referring to a dramatic quantity, not to any person or character’s actual mental condition.) Will Carrie’s mania re-emerge as a primary driver of the plot?

We don’t have much to say but are grateful to the NYT for recognizing the fan protest in an even-handed manner!

Thanks NYT!

If the #NotOurHomeland campaign accomplished nothing else, at the very least it has not let them get away with sweeping their mess under the rug. Makes me giggle every time an article comes out and the paragraph about NOH is at the bottom. Whatever narrative they try to spin, it will always be tied to a very public objection. Well done on that one!

Oh, we plan to keep reminding the press what’s what. We’re working on some new messaging which we plan to share when the timing is right. 

(No one in the press cares about Homeland during the middle of the hiatus.)

The tricky part is not interfering with Rupert’s (outside) chances for future award nominations in the new year. A further dark clouding over Homeland could effect that.

But, you know what? I, and plenty of others, may have settled into this vomitous canon but we will never, ever let Gansa forget that we are a ridiculously smart, accomplished group of global women who will not stop until he actually acknowledges the rage.

It’s important.

If the #NotOurHomeland campaign accomplished nothing else, at the very least it has not let them get away with sweeping their mess under the rug. Makes me giggle every time an article comes out and the paragraph about NOH is at the bottom. Whatever narrative they try to spin, it will always be tied to a very public objection. Well done on that one!

Oh, we plan to keep reminding the press what’s what. We’re working on some new messaging which we plan to share when the timing is right. 

(No one in the press cares about Homeland during the middle of the hiatus.)

The tricky part is not interfering with Rupert’s (outside) chances for future award nominations in the new year. A further dark clouding over Homeland could effect that.

But, you know what? I, and plenty of others, may have settled into this vomitous canon but we will never, ever let Gansa forget that we are a ridiculously smart, accomplished group of global women who will not stop until he actually acknowledges the rage.

It’s important.

The Death of Quinn In This Way Killed Homeland

notourhomeland:

Mr. Alex Gansa
I have never written a letter like this but after being a loyal fan of Homeland since the beginning I wanted to thank you for past seasons that drew me in and kept me watching.  Season six was NOT up to the standards of the past. It seemed that you got a little too caught up into the politics of our election and started to create a female president ie Hillary projected to be the winner. Then when your preferred candidate lost you turned her into a psychopath. Then you wanted this psychopath to be the reason Quinn was killed protecting her and Carrie.  

You said you wanted Quinn’s journey with disability, PTSD, and his mental health issues to be a tribute to our returning veterans. Really that was the tribute?  I mean if you really wanted it to be a tribute certainly you have a little more creativity than you showed in season six. I mean even the wicked vice president got a funeral but not Quinn.  If you have lost the mojo on this show pass the baton to someone more enthusiastic. The show has been dark and WAY too political this last season. I cancelled Showtime after it was over and will not renew until I hear what direction the show is going but from the previews it appears that it is a hate the president political rant. I have grown weary of that topic and it bores me.  

I was so happy that the Quinn character evolved over the years and quite frankly he was the only reason I watched season 6. I am not little girl fan I am a college educated 57 year old woman that used to enjoy the intrigue and  complexity of Homeland.  I can now really see in your writing this last season your “no longer give and damn attitude” is present in the storyline.  It was like you decided to just kill the whole show’s integrity by trashing the disabled veteran. Please take your political views out of your writing we are not interested in them. America is so sick of politics please for God’s sake start writing the show like you cared about the SHOW and the people that watch the show.

It would be nice for you to resolve the Quinn issue and at least have some positive flashbacks, a funeral scene, a scene where he holds his son … Something positive for the hero veteran. The way you cut him out of the show was sloppy and disrespectful to all our US Veterans.  

Sincerely
Robin Wilson

The Death of Quinn In This Way Killed Homeland

Mr. Alex Gansa
I have never written a letter like this but after being a loyal fan of Homeland since the beginning I wanted to thank you for past seasons that drew me in and kept me watching.  Season six was NOT up to the standards of the past. It seemed that you got a little too caught up into the politics of our election and started to create a female president ie Hillary projected to be the winner. Then when your preferred candidate lost you turned her into a psychopath. Then you wanted this psychopath to be the reason Quinn was killed protecting her and Carrie.  

You said you wanted Quinn’s journey with disability, PTSD, and his mental health issues to be a tribute to our returning veterans. Really that was the tribute?  I mean if you really wanted it to be a tribute certainly you have a little more creativity than you showed in season six. I mean even the wicked vice president got a funeral but not Quinn.  If you have lost the mojo on this show pass the baton to someone more enthusiastic. The show has been dark and WAY too political this last season. I cancelled Showtime after it was over and will not renew until I hear what direction the show is going but from the previews it appears that it is a hate the president political rant. I have grown weary of that topic and it bores me.  

I was so happy that the Quinn character evolved over the years and quite frankly he was the only reason I watched season 6. I am not little girl fan I am a college educated 57 year old woman that used to enjoy the intrigue and  complexity of Homeland.  I can now really see in your writing this last season your “no longer give and damn attitude” is present in the storyline.  It was like you decided to just kill the whole show’s integrity by trashing the disabled veteran. Please take your political views out of your writing we are not interested in them. America is so sick of politics please for God’s sake start writing the show like you cared about the SHOW and the people that watch the show.

It would be nice for you to resolve the Quinn issue and at least have some positive flashbacks, a funeral scene, a scene where he holds his son … Something positive for the hero veteran. The way you cut him out of the show was sloppy and disrespectful to all our US Veterans.  

Sincerely
Robin Wilson

About how Homeland..

notourhomeland:

Señor Gansa,

My words will be brief.
I will not write here about how Homeland hooked me from the first moment. No, I won’t.
I will not write here about how Carrie Mathison captivated me from the moment I met her. Of her phenomenal intuition, her defiance of the rules, her perpetual selfishness, her audacity, her bipolar, her irrepressible calling, her permanent discomfort, her voracious determination, her enormous emotional difficulties, her personal way of living (and not living) her life. No, I won’t.
I will not write here about how Nicholas Brody attracted me. Of his weak will, his fractured intimacy, his fate marked in tragedy from the very beginning, his impossibility, his moral values, his broken soul. No, I won´t.
I will not write here about how Saul Berenson interested me. Of his variable morality, his absolute dedication to his work, his relationship with Carrie, his use of Carrie. No, I won’t.
I will not write here about how Peter Quinn caught me. Of his sustained loyalty, his exposed conscience, his constant questioning of his work and his being, his hardness and his enormous vulnerability, his incessant and profound love for Carrie, his invisibility, his desires and impossibilities, his deep sense of duty, his irreparable solitude, of his desolate life. No, I won’t.
I will write here about how Homeland attracted me. The way the characters interacted with each other doing their exceptional work, being the best at it, and at the same time, struggling to bond emotionally. Their public fights and their private ones. That duality is what has deeply captivated me throughout all this time. I have enjoyed the frenetic pace of the action, but much more, the moments of pause, when the characters have settle down, and their most intimate dimension appeared, the most imperceptible, what lies beneath. That is what got me emotionally involved with them. That was my personal tie to the series.
I will write here about how I have lost track of Carrie during the past two seasons. I almost don’t recognize her anymore, I don’t know what she wants anymore, I don’t know what she is looking for anymore, sometimes I don’t even know who she is anymore, or what I want for her.
I will write here about the pain it caused me to see Quinn tortured in the last two seasons. The pain of witnessing the destruction of the character, subjected to incessant, ruthless, physical and emotional torments, shown with overwhelming dignity and poignant inner strength to survive, only thanks to the immense performance of Rupert Friend, who made Quinn and his final course, a broken and sensitive character, stoic, laconic, heartfelt and loved to the impossible.
I will write here about the extreme faith I always had in Quinn. As a viewer, that total faith in him was from where I stood to watch Homeland. Quinn gave me the faith through which to look at Carrie, the faith to understand her actions and her non-actions a little more, the faith to forgive her a little more, the faith to love her a little more. That faith in him was my passage to my faith in her, the protagonist. The faith that Homeland, while telling stories of broken characters in a world of extreme actions and dishonest and disloyal relationships, cared about them. The faith I needed to watch the series and get involved emotionally with the characters.
I will write here about what it means to me that Homeland has killed Quinn. Killing Quinn was killing the only real, selfless and honest ally Carrie had. It was killing the unique and hypnotic relationship that these two had, it was killing the possibility of redemption and forgiveness. It killing the possibility of Carrie’s growth, it was killing the belief that even though you were broken physically and emotionally, there is a possible way out. It was killing the possibility that Carrie could get to love and be loved. It was killing the attempt to tell, as challenging and difficult as it might have been, that Carrie and Quinn, though deeply damaged, might have found in one another a loving place to rest, where they could fight against the darkness that haunts them, where to be themselves, searching for their destiny, finding their way home or almost trying.
Señor Gansa, the death of Quinn and, also, the soulless way you decided to tell it, is the death of my faith and also of my love for Homeland. My love for Carrie and my faith for an overcoming journey for her in some way, my love for Quinn, and my faith for a physical and emotional recovery for him in some way, and finally my faith that you and your team of writers, cared for the characters. Cared for their development, respected them, believed in them and felt love for them, whatever their final destination, as much as I did.

Adiós Homeland,

Lorena Bender

Awesome letter!!!! 

About how Homeland..

Señor Gansa,

My words will be brief.
I will not write here about how Homeland hooked me from the first moment. No, I won’t.
I will not write here about how Carrie Mathison captivated me from the moment I met her. Of her phenomenal intuition, her defiance of the rules, her perpetual selfishness, her audacity, her bipolar, her irrepressible calling, her permanent discomfort, her voracious determination, her enormous emotional difficulties, her personal way of living (and not living) her life. No, I won’t.
I will not write here about how Nicholas Brody attracted me. Of his weak will, his fractured intimacy, his fate marked in tragedy from the very beginning, his impossibility, his moral values, his broken soul. No, I won´t.
I will not write here about how Saul Berenson interested me. Of his variable morality, his absolute dedication to his work, his relationship with Carrie, his use of Carrie. No, I won’t.
I will not write here about how Peter Quinn caught me. Of his sustained loyalty, his exposed conscience, his constant questioning of his work and his being, his hardness and his enormous vulnerability, his incessant and profound love for Carrie, his invisibility, his desires and impossibilities, his deep sense of duty, his irreparable solitude, of his desolate life. No, I won’t.
I will write here about how Homeland attracted me. The way the characters interacted with each other doing their exceptional work, being the best at it, and at the same time, struggling to bond emotionally. Their public fights and their private ones. That duality is what has deeply captivated me throughout all this time. I have enjoyed the frenetic pace of the action, but much more, the moments of pause, when the characters have settle down, and their most intimate dimension appeared, the most imperceptible, what lies beneath. That is what got me emotionally involved with them. That was my personal tie to the series.
I will write here about how I have lost track of Carrie during the past two seasons. I almost don’t recognize her anymore, I don’t know what she wants anymore, I don’t know what she is looking for anymore, sometimes I don’t even know who she is anymore, or what I want for her.
I will write here about the pain it caused me to see Quinn tortured in the last two seasons. The pain of witnessing the destruction of the character, subjected to incessant, ruthless, physical and emotional torments, shown with overwhelming dignity and poignant inner strength to survive, only thanks to the immense performance of Rupert Friend, who made Quinn and his final course, a broken and sensitive character, stoic, laconic, heartfelt and loved to the impossible.
I will write here about the extreme faith I always had in Quinn. As a viewer, that total faith in him was from where I stood to watch Homeland. Quinn gave me the faith through which to look at Carrie, the faith to understand her actions and her non-actions a little more, the faith to forgive her a little more, the faith to love her a little more. That faith in him was my passage to my faith in her, the protagonist. The faith that Homeland, while telling stories of broken characters in a world of extreme actions and dishonest and disloyal relationships, cared about them. The faith I needed to watch the series and get involved emotionally with the characters.
I will write here about what it means to me that Homeland has killed Quinn. Killing Quinn was killing the only real, selfless and honest ally Carrie had. It was killing the unique and hypnotic relationship that these two had, it was killing the possibility of redemption and forgiveness. It killing the possibility of Carrie’s growth, it was killing the belief that even though you were broken physically and emotionally, there is a possible way out. It was killing the possibility that Carrie could get to love and be loved. It was killing the attempt to tell, as challenging and difficult as it might have been, that Carrie and Quinn, though deeply damaged, might have found in one another a loving place to rest, where they could fight against the darkness that haunts them, where to be themselves, searching for their destiny, finding their way home or almost trying.
Señor Gansa, the death of Quinn and, also, the soulless way you decided to tell it, is the death of my faith and also of my love for Homeland. My love for Carrie and my faith for an overcoming journey for her in some way, my love for Quinn, and my faith for a physical and emotional recovery for him in some way, and finally my faith that you and your team of writers, cared for the characters. Cared for their development, respected them, believed in them and felt love for them, whatever their final destination, as much as I did.

Adiós Homeland,

Lorena Bender

notourhomeland:But it will go to shit without Quinn. Are you…

notourhomeland:

But it will go to shit without Quinn. Are you listening, Gansa?

But it will go to shit without Quinn. Are you listening, Gansa?

But it will go to shit without Quinn. Are you listening, Gansa?