Category: films with friend

findmyrupertfriend: FILMS WITH FRIEND ︱ Stryk…

findmyrupertfriend:

FILMS WITH FRIEND ︱ Stryka
↳ “THIS one. THIS is my person.”

findmyrupertfriend: STRYKA! Stryka is a nine-m…

findmyrupertfriend:

STRYKA!

Stryka is a nine-minute sci-fi short film set in futuristic Brooklyn starring Aimee as Stryka, a reptile alien thief, and Rupert as Callen, her partner in crime.

Stryka deals with some inner conflict by consulting a therapist. Hey, aliens need someone to talk to from time to time about the stresses in life, and Stryka is no different! Of course that conflict is about Callen, but I won’t go into further detail here. The short film is so short, I don’t want to spoil the storyline. But if you’re interested in seeing Rupert and Aimee on screen together, this one’s for you! 

Watch it here and tune in next week for the recap!

Watch this movie to hear Rupert’s super sexy Scottish accent! 

findmyrupertfriend: FILMS WITH FRIEND ︱ Starr…

findmyrupertfriend:

FILMS WITH FRIEND Starred Up
 “You can’t just walk in like that.”

findmyrupertfriend: FILMS WITH FRIEND ︱ Starr…

findmyrupertfriend:

FILMS WITH FRIENDStarred Up
↳ “Never talk to me again.
It’s one phone call,
clean head shot outside the gate.
All right?”

findmyrupertfriend: FILMS WITH FRIEND ︱ Starr…

findmyrupertfriend:

FILMS WITH FRIEND Starred Up 
↳ I think we should go with
your initial instinct, Christine
and give Eric Love the one chance
that Oliver thinks he needs.”

‘If I move he’ll attack’: mastering rage in pr…

‘If I move he’ll attack’: mastering rage in prisoners:

findmyrupertfriend:

Although I knew the focus of Starred Up was not Oliver Baumer (Rupert Friend), I was really left wanting to know more of Oliver’s background and character. In this article, Jonathan Asser, psychotherapist and screenwriter of Starred Up, gives beautiful insight into the character. I found it a fascinating read, especially given how Rupert was able to convey so much of Oliver’s character through his incredible screen presence.

Here are some highlights:

“I don’t look directly at him, and I don’t say anything, both of which at this moment would push him over the edge. Instead I communicate by sitting with my shoulders open and directly facing him, which shows I’m giving him my full attention and taking the risk he poses very seriously, while also showing the rest of the group I have the confidence to manage his risk. Every nuance of my body language is critical right now.”

Rupert captures these techniques perfectly during the movie, and conveys an intensity that is both authentic and terrifying! 

And where do Oliver’s emotions and reactions come from? I suspect they came from Asser’s experiences in childhood.

“From my earliest memories, aged four, I felt as if I didn’t exist and that I wasn’t human. Despite my complete physical and emotional rejection of my mother, neither my mother nor my father seemed to notice. The best thing was my father’s rage, which though terrifying did make me feel alive. Escalation was something I needed and craved.”

And more background on Oliver’s character becoming involved with the prison system:

“Then, in 1998, through a friend from university who had gone into the prison service, I was invited in to Feltham Young Offender Institution to give a creative writing workshop. As the series of gates clanged shut behind, as the cellblocks loomed, as a prisoner shouted out a probingly hostile comment to me through the mesh on the exercise yard, I felt I was home. I knew I was equipped with what it took to thrive here. Awash with anxiety, bewilderment and fear in the outside world, I had found a new brick mother, a new total institution that could once again make things simple and safe. The emotion I felt was akin to love.”

I definitely recommend reading the entire article in conjunction with watching the movie. You may find an even greater appreciation for the work Rupert does in this film.

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lalalarrr: findmyrupertfriend: STARRED UP (…

lalalarrr:

findmyrupertfriend:

STARRED UP (x)

The movie opens with Eric Love (Jack O’Connell) being transferred to an adult prison. He arrives on a rainy and gray day. Inside, Eric strips and the guards go through the usual humiliating and brusque search. Eric takes it all in silence, even as he is escorted into the prison population. Everyone is still in their cells, and he doesn’t express any emotion until he’s in his own cell by himself. He covers his head and face in his hands, while in slow motion he turns in circles. He’s just another caged animal.

Keep reading

One of my fav Rupert films!

findmyrupertfriend: “It’s been a long time (l…

findmyrupertfriend:

“It’s been a long time (long time), we shouldn’t of left you (left you),

Without a dope beat to step to (step to, step to, step to, step to).”

– “Try Again” lyrics

We know it’s been a while since the last Films With Friend, but Strange Angel kept us a little preoccupied. However, while we keep our fingers crossed that we get to see our dearly beloved in a second season, let us keep each other company with our next film – Starred Up.

Starred Up (2013) is not just about the horrors and inhumanity of prison. It’s also the tale of two men – father (Nevill Love portrayed by Ben Mendelsohn) and teenaged son (Eric Love portrayed by Jack O’Connell) – on a similarly violent path in life. The two have been estranged since Eric was five years old, but their paths converge when Eric becomes so violent, he is “starred up” and prematurely transferred into the adult prison where his father is incarcerated and wields much influence. In prison, Eric is enrolled into group therapy led by a volunteer psychotherapist, Oliver Baumer (Rupert Friend).

The film is directed by David Mackenzie and written by Jonathan Asser, psychotherapist and screenwriter. It was nominated for 12 different awards and won for Best Supporting Actor (Ben Mendelsohn) at the 2013 British Independent Film Awards, Best Actor (Jack O’Connell) at the 2014 Dublin International Film Festival, and Best British Newcomer (Jonathan Asser) at the 2014 London Film Festival.

O’Connell and Mendelsohn received many glowing reviews for their performances, and indeed, I truly enjoyed all of the performances in this film. My heart literally pounded all the way through. But since our interest here focuses on Rupert, I’ll leave you with a particularly lovely mention:

“His onscreen alter ego is Oliver, a terrifically edgy performance from Rupert Friend, whose angular body language speaks volumes, and whose reasons for placing himself in the line of fire are rooted in neatly unspecified personal trauma.”(x)

We’ll post the review next Friday, so watch the movie if you can (buy the DVD or rent it through Amazon Prime Video) and stay tuned for some intense scenes!

image

This is a fantastic, super intense film. 

Watch with subtitles if you can — the accents are sometimes hard to understand.

findmyrupertfriend: “It’s been a long time (l…

findmyrupertfriend:

“It’s been a long time (long time), we shouldn’t of left you (left you),

Without a dope beat to step to (step to, step to, step to, step to).”

– “Try Again” lyrics

We know it’s been a while since the last Films With Friend, but Strange Angel kept us a little preoccupied. However, while we keep our fingers crossed that we get to see our dearly beloved in a second season, let us keep each other company with our next film – Starred Up.

Starred Up (2013) is not just about the horrors and inhumanity of prison. It’s also the tale of two men – father (Nevill Love portrayed by Ben Mendelsohn) and teenaged son (Eric Love portrayed by Jack O’Connell) – on a similarly violent path in life. The two have been estranged since Eric was five years old, but their paths converge when Eric becomes so violent, he is “starred up” and prematurely transferred into the adult prison where his father is incarcerated and wields much influence. In prison, Eric is enrolled into group therapy led by a volunteer psychotherapist, Oliver Baumer (Rupert Friend).

The film is directed by David Mackenzie and written by Jonathan Asser, psychotherapist and screenwriter. It was nominated for 12 different awards and won for Best Supporting Actor (Ben Mendelsohn) at the 2013 British Independent Film Awards, Best Actor (Jack O’Connell) at the 2014 Dublin International Film Festival, and Best British Newcomer (Jonathan Asser) at the 2014 London Film Festival.

O’Connell and Mendelsohn received many glowing reviews for their performances, and indeed, I truly enjoyed all of the performances in this film. My heart literally pounded all the way through. But since our interest here focuses on Rupert, I’ll leave you with a particularly lovely mention:

“His onscreen alter ego is Oliver, a terrifically edgy performance from Rupert Friend, whose angular body language speaks volumes, and whose reasons for placing himself in the line of fire are rooted in neatly unspecified personal trauma.”(x)

We’ll post the review next Friday, so watch the movie if you can (buy the DVD or rent it through Amazon Prime Video) and stay tuned for some intense scenes!

image

findmyrupertfriend:HAPPY FRIDAY, FRIENDS! ︱ Th…

findmyrupertfriend:

HAPPY FRIDAY, FRIENDS! The Moon and the Stars
↳ “How much did that reporter give you to tell him all the filth about Davide and me?”

🔥🔥🔥