Category: being british

findmyrupertfriend: CLASS OF 2004

findmyrupertfriend:

CLASS OF 2004

Rupert has just celebrated fifteen years as a professional actor. To mark the moment, I’ve been exploring where he learned his craft.

The Webber-Douglas Academy was in a posh part of town, South Kensington (where Princess Diana liked to shop and socialise). The main building was in a quaint little back street.

An official inspection of the school in 2002 noted some key teaching techniques:

‘Students benefit from the variety of perspectives adopted by movement teachers. In one class, the use of historical photographs and paintings of people gave an imaginative starting point for them to inhabit a particular moment in time and gradually bring these people to life. In another class, the teacher used a combination of semi-hypnotic trance and gentle manipulation of the head and shoulders to help students achieve perfect posture’.

It’s interesting to reflect on how this helped shape Rupert’s dramatic practice, although, in a 2015 Guardian interview, Rupert typically played things down:

‘There’s some technique involved,’ he says of acting. ‘But I think there’s been an overcomplication of it, in a sense. If you say to a kid: “We’re going to play cowboys and Indians, that’s the fort, you guard it” – the kid doesn’t have to sit and think about the role for 20 minutes in silence with their acting coach. They just do it.’ That’s how he tries to act, says Friend, through a process of infantalising.

The school’s Chanticleer Theatre was described by The Stage as having ‘almost the feel of an old, small music hall about it [with] the added edge that its small space offers little refuge for graduating students whose performances are not right on the button. If they are though, they can really impress.’

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It may not have been a very glamourous space but it was the fulcrum for our boy’s talent, and impress he certainly did.

On April 15th, 2004, The Stage reported perceptively on the end-of-year graduate showcase:

There were two powerful double-acts. The first of the latter came in the form of a dark comic interplay between Rupert Friend and David Hayler as Harold Pinter’s inept hitmen from The Dumb Waiter. Friend, with flowing locks and fine cheekbones, later gave us a splendidly aristocratic libertine.’

How uncanny are those final words – just as he was about to be talent spotted and cast in the film with Johnny Depp!

Finally, one of Rupert’s fellow-graduates in 2004 was Natalie Dormer (of The Tudors). I’d really like to see them reunited some time – a period drama, perhaps? Mmm…

findmyrupertfriend: So, in the midst of Brexi…

findmyrupertfriend:

So, in the midst of Brexit madness, all over the news, the screen, the radio, social media, with Teresa May’s pathetic government an international laughing stock, I thought I’d escape into the newly released At Eternity’s Gate. It’s only been on very limited release in the UK since March 29th and had a reasonably strong opening weekend (grossing £58,789 – approximately $76, 688). To get myself warmed up, I rewatched the great interview Rupert did back in November with Zach Laws when the film came out in the States.  You probably remember the red eye and possible stye (HERE!).  

So, I enjoyed the close up (what sort of room was he in?) and the reminiscences (about his growing up among art, thanks to his art historian father, who, I recently discovered, was a good friend of one of my own friends – annoyingly before my time!). I was struck by Rupert’s sensitive attitudes towards mental health, considering the label ‘mad’ (‘I’m increasingly interested in the idea that there might be something really special that such people have to offer’). When the conversation shifted to The Death of Stalin, I slipped into warm memories of how much fun that film was, how hysterical Rupert was as Vasily, and relished the details of how Rupert had been allowed free rein, coming up with the surprise ice-skates and perfecting the face-spitting in his trailer. Rupert’s comment that the most popular request he gets now is not for an autograph but to spit on himself made me smile broadly. My literary scholar’s ears pricked up in pleasure at his reference to A Modest Proposal, Jonathan Swift’s scathing satire on the oppression of the Irish (my ancestors) … and then, suddenly, everything was shattered, when Rupert said of Stalin’s government, ‘This was really a cabinet of fools, dancing this crazy farce out’ – and I found myself plunged right back into Brexit! Rupert doesn’t speak out much on politics, but I can’t help feeling this pointed observation resonates deeply with regards to the current madness. Thanks, Rupert! I’m off to the cinema to spend time with Van Gogh …

findmyrupertfriend: Anonymous asked:  For Che…

findmyrupertfriend:

Anonymous asked:  For Cherry and other Brits. How is Rupert’s Scottish accent in Stryka? I adore it, as an American!! Please tell me it is spot on.

Thanks for giving me a good reason to rewatch Stryka – a weird and wonderful beastie, where Rupes provides what shortoftheweek.com described as ‘a bit of star power’. More than a bit, I’d say! Seeing his cute spikey hair again was a nostalgia trip in itself. But my mission was his accent …

And, guess what? Those of you who remember my previous ventures into the ‘British’ accent won’t be surprised to hear that for Scottish, too, there’s no such thing; it’s a loose umbrella term for a myriad different, localisable ways of speaking. And here, our boy is smashing the Edinburgh accent. I say to Rupes, as Callen says to Stryka (7’30”): ‘Your accent’s amazing!’

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The film script has none of the traditional ‘broad’ Scottish dialect: classics such as ‘wee’, ‘bonny’ ‘heed’ (for head), ‘aye’ or ‘bairn’ which anyone impersonating a Scot would most likely use as they’re so clichéd. But the accent is immediately recognisable as authentically Scottish because it’s a classic, precise Edinburgh accent (much softer, clearer and less ‘shouty’ than other types, such as Glaswegian – from Glasgow) and so, widely favoured for international intelligibility. One key feature is the vowel sound ‘oo’, which is identical in words such as ‘foot’, ‘good’, ‘school’ and ‘choose’, so that ‘pool’ and ‘pull’ are indistinguishable.

Rupert hits all the right notes – the squashed vowel in ‘phone’, the audible ‘r’ in ‘ears open’, the rising intonation at the end of questions (‘what are you guys up to?’, ‘What’s phase two?’), overly pronounced medial ‘t’ alongside glottal stopped final ‘t’ (‘nineteen seconds’, ‘about it’). Especially diagnostic is his fabulous ‘great’ – splitting the diphthong with a slightly trilled ‘r’ (worth a listen – he repeats it three times at 4’55”).

Looking more closely, he’s given Callen a particular subset of the Edinburgh accent, very close to Ewan MacGregor. This is known as the ‘Millennial’ Edinburgh accent, favoured by students and the upwardly mobile. Leaves me wondering, does he have friends from Edinburgh? And was it his idea to make Callen Scottish? Further research needed.

findmyrupertfriend: Anonymous asked:  For Che…

findmyrupertfriend:

Anonymous asked:  For Cherry and other Brits. How is Rupert’s Scottish accent in Stryka? I adore it, as an American!! Please tell me it is spot on.

Thanks for giving me a good reason to rewatch Stryka – a weird and wonderful beastie, where Rupes provides what shortoftheweek.com described as ‘a bit of star power’. More than a bit, I’d say! Seeing his cute spikey hair again was a nostalgia trip in itself. But my mission was his accent …

And, guess what? Those of you who remember my previous ventures into the ‘British’ accent won’t be surprised to hear that for Scottish, too, there’s no such thing; it’s a loose umbrella term for a myriad different, localisable ways of speaking. And here, our boy is smashing the Edinburgh accent. I say to Rupes, as Callen says to Stryka (7’30”): ‘Your accent’s amazing!’

image

The film script has none of the traditional ‘broad’ Scottish dialect: classics such as ‘wee’, ‘bonny’ ‘heed’ (for head), ‘aye’ or ‘bairn’ which anyone impersonating a Scot would most likely use as they’re so clichéd. But the accent is immediately recognisable as authentically Scottish because it’s a classic, precise Edinburgh accent (much softer, clearer and less ‘shouty’ than other types, such as Glaswegian – from Glasgow) and so, widely favoured for international intelligibility. One key feature is the vowel sound ‘oo’, which is identical in words such as ‘foot’, ‘good’, ‘school’ and ‘choose’, so that ‘pool’ and ‘pull’ are indistinguishable.

Rupert hits all the right notes – the squashed vowel in ‘phone’, the audible ‘r’ in ‘ears open’, the rising intonation at the end of questions (‘what are you guys up to?’, ‘What’s phase two?’), overly pronounced medial ‘t’ alongside glottal stopped final ‘t’ (‘nineteen seconds’, ‘about it’). Especially diagnostic is his fabulous ‘great’ – splitting the diphthong with a slightly trilled ‘r’ (worth a listen – he repeats it three times at 4’55”).

Looking more closely, he’s given Callen a particular subset of the Edinburgh accent, very close to Ewan MacGregor. This is known as the ‘Millennial’ Edinburgh accent, favoured by students and the upwardly mobile. Leaves me wondering, does he have friends from Edinburgh? And was it his idea to make Callen Scottish? Further research needed.

Duh, well I just learned something. The red po…

Duh, well I just learned something. The red poppy flower is a symbol of remembrance of WW1. There's a gentleman posing with Rupert at the recent AEG screening wearing one. AND.. I bet that's what Rupert's was the other day, you know, the one that appeared to be embroidered near his collar. That's our boy!

Part 2: Hi again. I just wrote in about the poppy flower. Just read that it’s Tom Hollander posing with Rupes at the AEG screening, the gentleman wearing the red flower. He was Mr. Collins in Pride & Prejudice, yes, the one that Rupes was in.

Yes, today is Remembrance Day (Nov 11) and today marks 100 years since WWI ended.

The poppy is – especially in the UK – to remember those who have given their lives in war.

The reason poppies are used to remember those who have given their lives in battle is because they are the flowers which grew on the battlefields after World War One ended.

This is described in the famous World War One poem In Flanders Fields, which you can read below.

Ever since then, they have come to be a symbol of remembering, not just those who gave their lives in World War One, but all those who have died on behalf of their country.

In the days leading up to November 11, you will see people on TV and in the streets all over the UK wearing a poppy.

Every year, volunteers make poppies available throughout the country and people make a donation in order to get their poppy.

The money raised from these donations is used to help servicemen and women who are still alive, whose lives have been changed by wars that they fought in.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

Question for Cherry. Rupert said in an article…

Question for Cherry. Rupert said in an article not too long ago that one of the reasons he was bullied was because of his name. Isn't the name Rupert pretty common in Britain? Why would he be bullied having this name?

Well, as with so many other aspects of life in Britain, it’s hard to avoid the subject of class here. Rupert is an extremely ‘middle-class’ name, not a name you’d hear in many state schools. It came over with the German aristocracy in the early seventeenth century (the first known Rupert in England was the king’s nephew, Prince Rupert of the Rhine). Given Rupert’s comfortable upbringing in rural Oxfordshire, he probably mixed with children of a similar class, so they would be unlikely to pick on him for his ‘posh’ name. The main factor in any bullying would probably be the tv series from the 1970s with its great singalong theme tune. I bet he heard versions of this all the time in the playground! By the time Rupert was growing up, it had been off-air for a while but it’s one of those tunes that sticks. And being primarily associated with a cartoon animal can’t be ideal for any child, especially a boy with that haircut. Still, at least, subliminally, it influenced his fashion sense, endowing him with a quirky love of mustard coloured trousers and jaunty scarves! So, let’s celebrate, ‘Rupert, Rupert the bear, everyone sing his name … everyone come and join in all of his games!’