Category: being british

findmyrupertfriend: Anonymous asked:  For Che…

findmyrupertfriend:

Anonymous asked:  For Cherry and other Brits. How is Rupert’s Scottish accent in Stryka? I adore it, as an American!! Please tell me it is spot on.

Thanks for giving me a good reason to rewatch Stryka – a weird and wonderful beastie, where Rupes provides what shortoftheweek.com described as ‘a bit of star power’. More than a bit, I’d say! Seeing his cute spikey hair again was a nostalgia trip in itself. But my mission was his accent …

And, guess what? Those of you who remember my previous ventures into the ‘British’ accent won’t be surprised to hear that for Scottish, too, there’s no such thing; it’s a loose umbrella term for a myriad different, localisable ways of speaking. And here, our boy is smashing the Edinburgh accent. I say to Rupes, as Callen says to Stryka (7’30”): ‘Your accent’s amazing!’

image

The film script has none of the traditional ‘broad’ Scottish dialect: classics such as ‘wee’, ‘bonny’ ‘heed’ (for head), ‘aye’ or ‘bairn’ which anyone impersonating a Scot would most likely use as they’re so clichéd. But the accent is immediately recognisable as authentically Scottish because it’s a classic, precise Edinburgh accent (much softer, clearer and less ‘shouty’ than other types, such as Glaswegian – from Glasgow) and so, widely favoured for international intelligibility. One key feature is the vowel sound ‘oo’, which is identical in words such as ‘foot’, ‘good’, ‘school’ and ‘choose’, so that ‘pool’ and ‘pull’ are indistinguishable.

Rupert hits all the right notes – the squashed vowel in ‘phone’, the audible ‘r’ in ‘ears open’, the rising intonation at the end of questions (‘what are you guys up to?’, ‘What’s phase two?’), overly pronounced medial ‘t’ alongside glottal stopped final ‘t’ (‘nineteen seconds’, ‘about it’). Especially diagnostic is his fabulous ‘great’ – splitting the diphthong with a slightly trilled ‘r’ (worth a listen – he repeats it three times at 4’55”).

Looking more closely, he’s given Callen a particular subset of the Edinburgh accent, very close to Ewan MacGregor. This is known as the ‘Millennial’ Edinburgh accent, favoured by students and the upwardly mobile. Leaves me wondering, does he have friends from Edinburgh? And was it his idea to make Callen Scottish? Further research needed.

findmyrupertfriend: Anonymous asked:  For Che…

findmyrupertfriend:

Anonymous asked:  For Cherry and other Brits. How is Rupert’s Scottish accent in Stryka? I adore it, as an American!! Please tell me it is spot on.

Thanks for giving me a good reason to rewatch Stryka – a weird and wonderful beastie, where Rupes provides what shortoftheweek.com described as ‘a bit of star power’. More than a bit, I’d say! Seeing his cute spikey hair again was a nostalgia trip in itself. But my mission was his accent …

And, guess what? Those of you who remember my previous ventures into the ‘British’ accent won’t be surprised to hear that for Scottish, too, there’s no such thing; it’s a loose umbrella term for a myriad different, localisable ways of speaking. And here, our boy is smashing the Edinburgh accent. I say to Rupes, as Callen says to Stryka (7’30”): ‘Your accent’s amazing!’

image

The film script has none of the traditional ‘broad’ Scottish dialect: classics such as ‘wee’, ‘bonny’ ‘heed’ (for head), ‘aye’ or ‘bairn’ which anyone impersonating a Scot would most likely use as they’re so clichéd. But the accent is immediately recognisable as authentically Scottish because it’s a classic, precise Edinburgh accent (much softer, clearer and less ‘shouty’ than other types, such as Glaswegian – from Glasgow) and so, widely favoured for international intelligibility. One key feature is the vowel sound ‘oo’, which is identical in words such as ‘foot’, ‘good’, ‘school’ and ‘choose’, so that ‘pool’ and ‘pull’ are indistinguishable.

Rupert hits all the right notes – the squashed vowel in ‘phone’, the audible ‘r’ in ‘ears open’, the rising intonation at the end of questions (‘what are you guys up to?’, ‘What’s phase two?’), overly pronounced medial ‘t’ alongside glottal stopped final ‘t’ (‘nineteen seconds’, ‘about it’). Especially diagnostic is his fabulous ‘great’ – splitting the diphthong with a slightly trilled ‘r’ (worth a listen – he repeats it three times at 4’55”).

Looking more closely, he’s given Callen a particular subset of the Edinburgh accent, very close to Ewan MacGregor. This is known as the ‘Millennial’ Edinburgh accent, favoured by students and the upwardly mobile. Leaves me wondering, does he have friends from Edinburgh? And was it his idea to make Callen Scottish? Further research needed.

Duh, well I just learned something. The red po…

Duh, well I just learned something. The red poppy flower is a symbol of remembrance of WW1. There's a gentleman posing with Rupert at the recent AEG screening wearing one. AND.. I bet that's what Rupert's was the other day, you know, the one that appeared to be embroidered near his collar. That's our boy!

Part 2: Hi again. I just wrote in about the poppy flower. Just read that it’s Tom Hollander posing with Rupes at the AEG screening, the gentleman wearing the red flower. He was Mr. Collins in Pride & Prejudice, yes, the one that Rupes was in.

Yes, today is Remembrance Day (Nov 11) and today marks 100 years since WWI ended.

The poppy is – especially in the UK – to remember those who have given their lives in war.

The reason poppies are used to remember those who have given their lives in battle is because they are the flowers which grew on the battlefields after World War One ended.

This is described in the famous World War One poem In Flanders Fields, which you can read below.

Ever since then, they have come to be a symbol of remembering, not just those who gave their lives in World War One, but all those who have died on behalf of their country.

In the days leading up to November 11, you will see people on TV and in the streets all over the UK wearing a poppy.

Every year, volunteers make poppies available throughout the country and people make a donation in order to get their poppy.

The money raised from these donations is used to help servicemen and women who are still alive, whose lives have been changed by wars that they fought in.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

Question for Cherry. Rupert said in an article…

Question for Cherry. Rupert said in an article not too long ago that one of the reasons he was bullied was because of his name. Isn't the name Rupert pretty common in Britain? Why would he be bullied having this name?

Well, as with so many other aspects of life in Britain, it’s hard to avoid the subject of class here. Rupert is an extremely ‘middle-class’ name, not a name you’d hear in many state schools. It came over with the German aristocracy in the early seventeenth century (the first known Rupert in England was the king’s nephew, Prince Rupert of the Rhine). Given Rupert’s comfortable upbringing in rural Oxfordshire, he probably mixed with children of a similar class, so they would be unlikely to pick on him for his ‘posh’ name. The main factor in any bullying would probably be the tv series from the 1970s with its great singalong theme tune. I bet he heard versions of this all the time in the playground! By the time Rupert was growing up, it had been off-air for a while but it’s one of those tunes that sticks. And being primarily associated with a cartoon animal can’t be ideal for any child, especially a boy with that haircut. Still, at least, subliminally, it influenced his fashion sense, endowing him with a quirky love of mustard coloured trousers and jaunty scarves! So, let’s celebrate, ‘Rupert, Rupert the bear, everyone sing his name … everyone come and join in all of his games!’