I was just reading a new article at Vanity Fair about Dawson’s Creek. There was a mention of AFG. Sounds like he didn’t quite mesh with that show, since they fired him, I assume. I never watched that show, but curious to know your thoughts, if any. Thanks!

If anyone in this fandom is still trying to get their heads around wtf has happened to Homeland’s once-great writing, PLEASE read these articles about Dawson’s creek!

This article you reference is SO interesting. It’s here. This is the part pertaining to Gansa:

The series’s new show-runner, Alex Gansa, was an accomplished writer who would go on to produce Homeland and 24—but he didn’t quite get what made Dawson feel like Dawson. The season kicked off with a story line about a new character named Eve, a temptress straight out of film noir who seduced Dawson and stirred up trouble in his fictional sleepy town.

“I had never worked in television,” Kapinos, who joined the staff in the third season, says. “I showed up on the first day, and almost quit. I didn’t really understand the stories they were talking about, and it didn’t seem like the show I had watched for two seasons. I don’t think I said a word for about six weeks.” He singles out the Eve arc as a “colossal mistake.”

Meanwhile, the actors were also unhappy with their story lines—especially an arc that involved Jen and Pacey hooking up—and they went straight to the network to complain. After a production shutdown, Gansa was out.

But guess what? I can see you and raise you! Check out this super-gossipy excerpt from a book on the same writer’s room. It’s an incredibly entertaining read and takes you through the decades of chaotic change that most middle age writers on these shows have lived through.

We were officially entering Crisis Mode. One of our bosses, executive producer Paul Stupin, paced the cagelike conference room, a nervous mother hen encouraging every idea that hatched from the writing staff. “I love it! I love it!” was shouted at even the most inane story ideas… Coming off Party of Five, coexecutive producer Tammy Ader wanted us to do touching stories where Dawson saved the creek from industrial pollution. Coming off The X Files, executive producer Alex Gansa wanted us to do dark stories about a promiscuous girl named Eve. The more the new writing showrunners would disagree, the more anxiously enthusiastic the nonwriting showrunner would become. In the center of this mad triangle sat the new writing staff, aimlessly pitching anything and everything, looking for direction, and wondering what the hell Sony, our studio, was thinking when they created this scenario.

How these grown-ass adults who are professional writers making huge money can create this much dysfunction and piss poor writing is totally beyond me.